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    Eric from Spket says he's working on a new version supporting Ext 4.x. So far (for ExtJS 2 & 3) Spket was in my opinion the best alternative.

    PhpStorm/WebStorm has fantastic support for Ext and apparently it works well with version 4 too, but for some reason I couldn't get used to their strange way of implementing autosave in the IDE; basically your open files are always saved in the background, you can't discard changes except if you restore an old version from history... which is quite strange. I don't like the idea of not being able to control when/what/if I save in my IDE.

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    there is a tab at the bottom: changes, this helps keep tracking.

    I also recommend to work with VCS, so autosave helps for easy coding (at least it does for me)
    vg Steffen
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    Release Manager of TYPO3 4.5

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    Eric from Spket says he's working on a new version supporting Ext 4.x. So far (for ExtJS 2 & 3) Spket was in my opinion the best alternative.
    This made my day

    Upgrading to 4 just got a whole lot less scary for me!

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    Quote Originally Posted by icflorescu View Post
    Eric from Spket says he's working on a new version supporting Ext 4.x. So far (for ExtJS 2 & 3) Spket was in my opinion the best alternative.

    PhpStorm/WebStorm has fantastic support for Ext and apparently it works well with version 4 too, but for some reason I couldn't get used to their strange way of implementing autosave in the IDE; basically your open files are always saved in the background, you can't discard changes except if you restore an old version from history... which is quite strange. I don't like the idea of not being able to control when/what/if I save in my IDE.
    If i remember exactly there's also a setting to increase/decrease the time between savings. Honestly, i really like the autosaving feature as i don't have to worry about loosing my code. If you want to revert, there's the awesome local history they have which is something like a mini versioning sistem

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    I use NetBeans IDE both for ExtJS and PHP

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    Was using Komodo Edit, but have since found Sublime Text, and love it's speed and Goto Anywhere feature.

    Not looked at Spket or Webstorm though, will have a look.

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    Using netbeans here also (for PHP with ZF support). I'm open to try other options as lately I'm doing more and more Extjs less and less PHP. Netbeans JS / ExtJs code completion is awfull remoteSave is great and easy to use.

    Gonna try webstorm when 2.0 is release. Their UI is awfull but I can live with it if the rest is better then Netbeans.

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    Ext JS Premium Member westy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by westy View Post
    Not looked at Spket or Webstorm though, will have a look.
    Well, tried them.
    Crikey, so slow, as are any desktop apps that use Java in my experience; gonna stick with Sublime I think... I like the fact with Sublime a project is not confined to a directory tree (something that's new to me and will be hard to let go of), so can have my source (across multiple repos), and the Ext source all in the same project, and be able to open any of the classes with a few typed chars

    I'm pretty convinced that proper, correct Ext auto-completion (or even JavaScript for that matter) is impossible anyway.
    It's such a free, unconstrained language, allowing you to extend or hack any object or function that takes your fancy, how on earth can anything actually offer completion for it without actually running the code, and analysing what is there after executing each line?

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    @westy

    Have you added EXTJS language support to Sublime? If so, how?

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    Quote Originally Posted by westy View Post
    I'm pretty convinced that proper, correct Ext auto-completion (or even JavaScript for that matter) is impossible anyway.
    It's such a free, unconstrained language, allowing you to extend or hack any object or function that takes your fancy, how on earth can anything actually offer completion for it without actually running the code, and analysing what is there after executing each line?
    Spket makes extensive use of JSDoc attributes. I think this is a better approach for JavaScript than trying to do analysis on the code itself, especially if you're trying to support multiple frameworks each with their own inheritance mechanism. I can't speak for the other editors, though I would assume the ones with good code completion look at the JSDoc too.