1. #11
    Sencha User
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    6
    Vote Rating
    1
    ClintNash is on a distinguished road

      0  

    Default Bump...

    Bump...


    Bump...

  2. #12
    Sencha User
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    11
    Vote Rating
    0
    vote539 is on a distinguished road

      0  

    Default


    Bump

  3. #13
    Ext JS Premium Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    227
    Vote Rating
    1
    alphadogg is on a distinguished road

      0  

    Default


    I also would like a better explanation of the various files. Pretty confused on the distinctions. Came to this thread via googling for "ext all debug dev".

  4. #14
    Sencha User
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    11
    Vote Rating
    0
    vote539 is on a distinguished road

      0  

    Default


    It says in the Ext.JS tutorial that:
    The second issue, however, is not easy to address because Ext.Window might depend on many other classes that it directly / indirectly inherits from, and in turn, these dependencies might depend on other classes to exist. For that reason, applications written before Ext JS 4 usually include the whole library in the form of ext-all.js even though they might only need a small portion of the framework.
    So in other words, ext-all.js contains all of the libraries, even those that you might not be using in production, while ext.js lets you include only those libraries that you need.

    I believe that the debug versions will throw errors to the console that are more helpful than those that are thrown in the production versions (making the files heavier).

film izle

hd film izle

film sitesi

takipci kazanma sitesi

takipci kazanma sitesi

güzel olan herşey

takipci alma sitesi

komik eğlenceli videolar