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    Default Overall file weight for ads? and more!

    Overall file weight for ads? and more!


    Ok, this may seem like a "newb" question, but its one I've only seen professionals ignore:

    What is an acceptable overall file weight (and number of get requests) for a rich-media mobile ad? IAB standards for GIFs are 40kb, and that's only one HTTP request. I've experimented with various tools which claim to be specifically for creating web animations for mobile ads (Adobe Edge Animate, and Sencha Animator) and the resulting files, for even the smallest and simplest of creatives, is HUGE. 200kb, 300kb... even the "healthy choice" demo for Sencha Animator exports at 400 something kb with 7 GET requests.

    I've run several tests with creatives made with the Adobe program and they received pretty low numbers (compared to visually identical, non-animated, single image static ads) even when using a single sprite for all of the images, and minifying my JS. My opinion is that 400kb over a sluggish 3g or even (*shudder) Edge Network is just too much for ads. Other type of web content? sure! people will wait a couple extra seconds for content they requested, but not for an advertisement.

    Has anyone else had similar experience? What do you consider to be acceptable in terms of file weight and number of requests? Has anyone actually gotten results using any of the tools currently available which claim to be specifically for developing mobile ad creatives?

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    Sencha User arnebech's Avatar
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    Default


    I don't think I can answer all of your questions, but I can shed some light on some of them.

    When a web-server is properly set up, all html will be sent in zipped format to the client meaning that for example a 50kb index.html file I have from Animator will now only take 8kb when zipped.

    Images are optimized per image, so that is left up to the user. In the case of healthy choice sample, the images are all large pngs, but if you switched to jpegs and lowered the quality you could significantly reduce the file size. For example I turned a .png to a .jpg for the healthy choice demo and the filesize went from 82kb to 6kb with an acceptable quality.

    Considering these two things, you could likely reduce the impact of the demo to ~50kb easily.

    To reduce the number of GET request, you could choose to inline all images in the HTML file in Animator. Doing this you could reduce the number of request to just one. The catch when inlining images is that they will typically take more space due to the encoding (~33%, however this will again be zipped by the web server so the actual size increase would likely be smaller).

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    Default Great advice. However, I'm still not sure

    Great advice. However, I'm still not sure


    Hey, thanks for the response. You outlined a few really good ways to speed up any web project. I agree, gzipping is a must. And using "sprites" (or a single image file, containing multiple images) does cut down on GET requests, which I've found to really be the biggest factor in lag on mobile...

    However, my question wasn't about how to make files smaller. 200kb gzipped is still 200kb. It's a given, one must always make compromises in quality, speed, and development time. The demo's file size is pretty hefty, but the effect is engaging and fluid, which comes in-part from the alpha transparency provided by using png's, instead of smaller jpegs. It's obvious which way the developers went: quality. Quality comes at a cost, I think we all know this. Much duller ads could be made for much less weight.

    My real question is: What's realistic and acceptable? Is anyone running these 200+kb creatives like this with any success? I was hoping to start a discussion on "how big is too big?" as we push the envelope of whats being done on mobile.