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    Default Progressive Enhancement with Ext JS

    Progressive Enhancement with Ext JS


    If progressive enhancement is a requirement for my app, is it possible with Ext JS? Is XTemplate the recommended way to do this?

    Thanks,

    Matt

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    can you please elaborate on "Progressive enhancement"?

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    Quote Originally Posted by jgarcia@tdg-i.com View Post
    can you please elaborate on "Progressive enhancement"?
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Progressive_enhancement

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    I think Jay understands what Progressive Enhancement is. But we need to know what YOU mean by Progressive Enhancement. From the Wikipedia article:
    In Progressive Enhancement (PE) the strategy is deliberately reversed: a basic markup document is created, geared towards the lowest common denominator of browser software functionality, and then the designer adds in functionality or enhancements to the presentation and behavior of the page, using modern technologies such as Cascading Style Sheets or JavaScript (or other advanced technologies, such as Flash or Java applets or SVG, etc.) All such enhancements are externally linked, in order to avoid forcing browsers of lesser capability to "eat" data they do not understand and cannot handle, or which would swamp their Internet connection.
    In other words, if you are using Progressive Enhancement, JavaScript (and therefore Ext) must be external to the main purpose of your site. So yes, you can add Ext's external JS and CSS files to any site you want. Ext is not an engine, it is a library -- it does nothing by itself.

    But perhaps you want a more specific answer...?

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    I think what's meant is more what the best practice is to output a basic html form on the server and "extify" it from client code.

    I think the easiest way to do this is probably to just replace the basic html code entirely with generated ext, but keeping the same field names so the server-side script can cope with either situation.

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    Quote Originally Posted by joeri View Post
    I think what's meant is more what the best practice is to output a basic html form on the server and "extify" it from client code.

    I think the easiest way to do this is probably to just replace the basic html code entirely with generated ext, but keeping the same field names so the server-side script can cope with either situation.
    So the best way to do progressive enhancement with Ext is to replace a form with an Ext form by modifying the DOM? Is it not possible to simply construct the form with HTML and then style it and ajaxify it with Ext?

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    You can do that too.

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    I think progressive enhancement with Ext may be a stretch, although it's possible. But if you're trying to make a full-blown web app that uses progressive enhancement, I think you're wasting your time.

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    To a point, I took an exising HTML only app and applied quite a lot of Ext functionality (mostly around forms) using the underlying HTML tags.

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    I would have to agree that progressive enhancement doesn't make sense for rich web apps.

    The gap in functionality between what basic mobile or text-mode browsers support and what rich web apps need to do is too big to engineer it using progressive enhancement in reasonable time.

    I just build two front-ends, a basic/mobile one, and a rich one. The nice thing is each front-end doesn't have to compromise. The mobile front-end offers up the same data, but the featureset is different from the rich client. It doesn't necessarily do less, it just does something different. It would be almost impossible to do that with progressive enhancement.