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View Full Version : When and why did the license change to LGPL?



PowersUSA
20 Feb 2007, 1:46 PM
I downloaded the alpha 1 zip today and when I opened up the license.txt file I was surprised to see the license has changed to from BSD to LGPL (I think 33 was some not straight BSD either).

What was wrong with the BSD license? Why the change?

I'm sure others are in the same boat I am. If want to use a library in a commercial project you have the pass the License through the legal department. The BSD license is much more palatable to the legal beagles than the LGPL is.

On top of that I already go approval for the BSD license now I need to jump through hoops to get the LGPL approved or I will not be able to advance my code base to the Ext 1.0 branch.

I have been singing the praises of Jack and Yui-Ext (now Ext?) and have been evangelizing its use within my development organization. I have also been tyring to drum up support for a corporate $$ support. Now with the license change I'm looking like a fool.

I don't mean to sound like sour grapes (I'm floored by what Jack is able to accomplish in such a short period of time, and I don't begrudge him his right to change licenses) I just need to know that the library that I'm promoting has a stable license that is not going to change release to release.

Jim P.
(donated the yui-ext domains a while back)

tryanDLS
20 Feb 2007, 1:56 PM
There's a huge thread in the Development forum discussing the license possibilities for version 1.0 and why the licensing was changed.

PowersUSA
20 Feb 2007, 2:29 PM
There's a huge thread in the Development forum discussing the license possibilities for version 1.0 and why the licensing was changed.

So from what I gather we can pay for a CDL license. That should work. Now on to integrating with alpha (I need a blow their socks off demo showing our photo chopped look-n-feel in action and the $$ will flow :-) ) .

brian.moeskau
20 Feb 2007, 3:10 PM
FYI, another primary reason that it's no longer using BSD is that BSD would allow others to freely fork Ext code and use it for their own commercial purposes. While it was simply an extension to YUI, this was not an issue. However, now that Ext is gaining commercial traction in its own right, Jack has rightly decided to switch his licensing to something that affords his work a bit more protection.